wirelesscollege.myfreeforum.org Forum Index wirelesscollege.myfreeforum.org
A Forum for former Instructors, Students and Friends of The Wireless College, Colwyn Bay, North Wales 1920 - 1970. www.wirelesscollege.co.uk
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   Join! (free) Join! (free)
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

1957 - 1960 Colwyn Bay

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    wirelesscollege.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> Jack & Alans Hostilery
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Please Register and Login to this forum to stop seeing this advertising.






Posted:     Post subject:

Back to top
Trevor Clements



Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 10


Location: Poole

PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:00 am    Post subject: 1957 - 1960 Colwyn Bay  Reply with quote

When we had the early reunions there were a good few from my era in attendance. Mike Zappert, Robin Filer, Simon Roach, Naish Kelly and others from Eire. David Barlow of course. I often wonder what happened to some of the other characters.

Pete Briggs, and Paddy Hurley (Smashing bloke QSO'd a few times when he was on 'Highliner'), but both gone now.

Where are R.O. Jones, Tom Prendergast, Mickey Spollen, Richard Twigg, Bernardubious Smitstefano, Tom Flanagan, Martin Dunne, Julian Dunne, Brodie the farmers son who got called up. Rae the lad who was a frustrated drummer always lisetening to Victor Sylvester.

What happened to all the local characters? Sid the Teddy boy who was going to give me a working over on the pier until Kaprinsky intervened.

What happened to the girls we were friendly with; Ann Jones from Old Colwyn, Pat Jones from Mochdre, Joan Morgan, those three were really gentle nice girls, Gwyneth Roberts, Elaine Carnell etc? These aren't proper girl friends, I wasn't very successful dating, until my last year.

We were always hungry, broke, and homesick, but it was all part of life's rich pattern, and thank you Kipper, Paddy, and Tubby Nelson for that.

Ah nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
_________________
Trevor Clements
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Clarke



Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 61


Location: Isle of Anglesey

PostPosted: Tue Aug 13, 2013 12:49 pm    Post subject: Re: 1957 - 1960 Colwyn Bay Reply with quote

Trevor Clements wrote:

We were always hungry, broke, and homesick, but it was all part of life's rich pattern, and thank you Kipper, Paddy, and Tubby Nelson for that.


Hi Trevor

Although our paths didn't cross at the WC I identify with much of your final paragraph - the "hungry and broke" bits anyway. I don't think I ever felt homesick whilst a student. That feeling overwhelmed me when in 1973 I left my baby daughter and wife to return to sea because I couldn't find a suitable job ashore; boy was I homesick then!  

Like you I was always hungry and also very cold (not just Isminos from Med climates felt this) since all we had on our ex-army WWOne beds were a thin grey army blanket and I didn't have an overcoat to use as additional insulation. I should have asked Isminos for the loan of some of his vast store of clothes. I vividly recall the rain (I sometimes thought it was the sea spray) lashing against the casement windows which themselves rattled and whistled as the draught forced its way between the sash and the frame. In that respect being in a forward (northerly) facing dorm was somewhat of a disadvantage.

My memory of asking for my pre-paid first term fees back still haunt me. I tried to do so within a week - having endured the prison food, the greasy fried sausages and fried eggs and the steamed (recycled bakery returns) white bread - only to be told that I'd have to see The Principal - Neville Whale (aka Kipper) but he was away on a cruise (enjoying my money I thought) and when I made an appointment to see him on his return I was fobbed-off with "we don't refund fees" - even for the remainder of the term.  I never forgave him for that and it made me even more determined to find a better alternative -- which I did.

James
_________________
There are no strangers here. Only friends you haven't yet met.              William Butler Yeats
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Trevor Clements



Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 10


Location: Poole

PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Last night while watching the Hollywood concert from the BBC Proms, I was nostalgic again when they sang 'All the way'. Tom Prendergast, had a great singing voice, and that was one of his repertoire.

Tom, myself, and R O Jones shared dorm 6 for a year, and Tom often well in his cups, was an entertaining  but terrifying room mate. I often wonder what happened to him.  Question
_________________
Trevor Clements
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Clarke



Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 61


Location: Isle of Anglesey

PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2013 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trevor Clements wrote:
Last night while watching the Hollywood concert from the BBC Proms, I was nostalgic again when they sang 'All the way'. Tom Prendergast, had a great singing voice, and that was one of his repertoire..........................................................................................................I often wonder what happened to him.  Question


Trevor

I watched the Proms which you mentioned from Friday on iPlayer last night and I agree with your sentiments as to the nostalgic appeal of many of the vocal tunes including "All the Way" by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Sammy Cahn which most of us heard sung by Frank Sinatra in the late 50s. The Proms are certainly a most impressive performance which sadly I do not often get to watch as the missus is not keen on any classical or neo-classical music - even modern music of the 50s, 60s etc. which involve (especially) sopranos or tenors exercising their vocal skills. Hence, my resorting to the BBC iPlayer for an archival replay - on my laptop with headphones connected - which provided a superb sound.

Regarding Tom Prendergast - I did a quick search and that name (could well be a son or nephew) came up several times in the vicinity of Limerick; several references to teaching. Was the Tom you knew from Limerick? If you knew any more about his origins and perhaps where he might have settled then it is possible to do a search for any references to him.

I am presently conducting online searches for family members using a variety of free resources and although it can take a lot of time it can be quite exciting when you come up with a positive result amongst the many hundreds of names that are offered. If you have any "lead" info on Tom I would be happy to include him in my searches on your behalf.

James
_________________
There are no strangers here. Only friends you haven't yet met.              William Butler Yeats
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Trevor Clements



Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 10


Location: Poole

PostPosted: Wed Sep 04, 2013 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom was from the south of Eire, but I cant remember where. Dont worry James, its only my misplaced nostalgia for my youth. There were two other lads, from Tullamore, Tom Flanagan and Martin Dunne. I specially remember Tom, he was a very kind considerate lad.

If nothing else, it was character forming at the Wireless College.
_________________
Trevor Clements
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
richardterry



Joined: 16 Jul 2007
Posts: 2



PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Trevor and James,  I doubt very much that you will remember me and in any case I am amazed how you and others recall names whereas I have the utmost difficulty.  Not surprising I suppose.  After all,  it was such a long time ago when I was a student (1956/57).  I did have a small circle of mates in my time there, notably Peter Wright (PAV) and another, Bernard Smith who loved to be referred to by his nickname.  I noted that on your list you had 'Bernardubious Smitsteffano' and it wouldn't surprise me if that was my mate. I know what happened to Peter but I have often wondered about Bernard who hailed from Crewe.  Two other close mates were two lads, one from Barton on Sea and another from Bristol.  The former described his home as 'Barton on the mud flats'  I thought I'd just pitch in one or two things that have stuck with me, none of which are in any particular order.  Living was not easy, the winters were freezing, the food was rubbish (we were always starving) but the mid morning walk down to the Dingle Café was great if we could afford a mug of tea and a Wagon Wheel biscuit.  The parrot there loved snapping pencils in half.  Sid Carruthers was the local hard man who wanted to sort out our Sid Kaprinski who frightened me to death incidentally. The Saturday night dance on the Pier was a highlight and a group of us would obtain Dutch courage by pooling our limited cash to buy a bottle of English VP wine which we used to top up pints of rough cider obtained from a bar on the pier. I was lucky because my older sisters had taught me to dance years earlier and there were loads of girls able and willing to take to the floor with me.  One in particular was called Pat from Old Colwyn, a beautiful but somewhat old fashioned girl who taught at the local Sunday School.  Say no more!  We spent  a number evenings at the local cinema just along from the station and the two films I recall well were 'Tarantula' and 'High Society'but there were many others and it was a great form of escapism.  The National Milk Bar next to the station was another haunt.  There was an evening when a load of College boys took to the water in Erias Park releasing all the pleasure boats and then suddenly  realised that the local police had arrived unannounced. We all hot footed it back to our dorms and popped into bed in wet clothes. The plod systematically worked their way around the building trying to identify the offenders.  They gave up in the end, there were far too many. I have more memories of course and won't bore you anymore at the moment except to say that I was in a dorm with a Welsh guy who used to burgle the seafront kiosks and return the stolen booty for distribution.  I hasten to add that this frightened me to death and I didn't get involved or receive anything. I think it was a case of live and let live. St Patrick's Night was always great. I got drunk and fell down two or three flights of stairs.  Not a scratch on me. It's surprising what you can get away with when you are under the influence of wompo. Anyway I hope some of this rings a bell with you guys.
Richard
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jack Edwards



Joined: 05 Jul 2007
Posts: 878


Location: Cheshire U.K.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 11, 2013 4:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome to the Tavern,Richard, It appears to be a much wilder place than my days in the early 40's more like a branch of Borstal! Looking forward to more! best wishes Jack.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Clarke



Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 61


Location: Isle of Anglesey

PostPosted: Tue Sep 17, 2013 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

richardterry wrote:
Hi Trevor and James, ......  Living was not easy, the winters were freezing, the food was rubbish (we were always starving) but the mid morning walk down to the Dingle Café was great if we could afford a mug of tea and a Wagon Wheel biscuit......... Anyway I hope some of this rings a bell with you guys.
Richard


Hi Richard

Back "on watch" after a spell of leave "ashore" when the missus and I travelled in our Motorhome to see our Grandchildren (and their parents) way up in the distant lands of Co. Durham. We also dropped-in to my main alma-mater Fleetwood to firm-up arrangements for the 3rd Reunion of Fleetwood Nautical College for 13/09/2014 (Yes! that is right about a year from now) which I organise. If you care to know more take a look at the website I set-up (use Internet Explorer to view it): www.fleetwoodnauticalcollege.org.uk where you can see lots of photos - in some of which I and my now wife Sue are to be seen as young 19 year olds - way back in 1968.

I guess our esteemed colleague Jack attended the WC during the luxury days of the early 1940s - so it may well have been well provided for food-wise as compared to the civilian population at large? In 1967 it was more like a scene from Dickens' Oliver Twist where you daren't ask "Please Sir can I have some more" - in case you were given more of the same barely edible stuff. Borstal boys would have been in the lap of luxury as compared to us at the WC.

So Yes! Richard your recollections certainly rang many bells and very loudly at that.  How about some more - as you delve deeper into those recesses of distant memory.  Names - I am afraid that is where I come undone as I usually remember faces (well the ones from the time I originally saw them) but have to be prompted with names - which I can then usually recall.

Btw did any of you hear BBC Radio 4's "Any Questions" which came from Colwyn Bay Friday evening 6th September (repeated Saturday afternoon 7th)? You can still listen to it on the BBC's podcast if interested (http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b039dbkl) . Obviously it was all about current affairs and only referred to North Wales in terms of the deprivation - especially in West Rhyl (which is a shock to see).  Sue and I often enjoy listening to talk programming like that and the Play for Today on BBC Radio 4 as we travel the long-legs of journeys between our far-flung family members' homes in various parts of the UK.  Yesterday, Monday 16th, the Play for Today/Afternoon Play was an interesting one based on two civilian contractors who worked for the US DoD from the New Mexico desert where they controlled one of those Drone Aircraft circling over Afghanistan and Pakistan and were instructed to take out specific enemy characters whom they had been watching (and listening into via mobile phone intercepts) from above.  Makes you think about the ethics of modern "defence" operations.
_________________
There are no strangers here. Only friends you haven't yet met.              William Butler Yeats
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
johnvvc



Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 5


Location: Anglesey

PostPosted: Sun Jan 05, 2014 7:47 pm    Post subject: 1957 - 1960 Colwyn Bay Reply with quote

Hi Trevor,

>>> When we had the early reunions there were a good few from my era in attendance. Mike Zappert, Robin Filer, Simon Roach, Naish Kelly and others from Eire. David Barlow of course. I often wonder what happened to some of the other characters. <<<

I was one of those ‘other characters’…  I suspect not many will remember me – I always managed to blend into the surroundings – bit like a chameleon really… a quality that proved invaluable on a number of occasions in my travels - being chased by jack booted German police up the Reeperbahn comes to mind… Laughing

I joined my first ship in February 1961 so I must have been at the Wireless College in 1959/1960.  Like lots of others I often wonder where some of the lads went to – and if they’re still around.  Some of the names mentioned here ring bells – yours for one Trevor!

Some of the other inmates I seem to remember were Taffy Jones and Pete Marshall, both from South Wales.  I don’t think neither completed the course.  There was a very pleasant coloured guy who was called Wanky - not too sure of the spelling – always raised a couple of chuckles during roll call.  Also a Scottish guy who – and I don’t know what makes me think this - went to work at the Colwyn Bay zoo…? There were also a couple of lads from Cheshire - Keith Langston – who may have gone into the fruit and veg business and Danny – Alan Daniels.  I think Keith left before completing the course but Danny may have got a Special ticket.  Went to stay with Keith once at Rudheath. Also some local Anglesey lads - Dennis Turner (crewcut) and Ian (Spiv), also Mike Williams from Holyhead.  Mike spent some time with IMR and finished off on the Cross Channel Ferries and is now living down in Kent.  Peter Ryan was another inmate, he hailed from Ellesmere Port I think. Sadly he’s no longer with us.  Then there was Abbo, seem to remember going to spend a few days with him as well and being shown ‘round the Morgan factory.

Now sitting here I find myself wondering just how much of the above is fact – the mind plays cruel tricks and of course it is half a century ago.  Perhaps someone here can confirm some of these details and help me persuade myself I still have my sanity!

I’ve not attended any of the Reunions – for which I feel ashamed – especially when I read of some of the guys who travel thousands of miles to be there – I really must do something about that.

Richardterry – you bring back some memories!  I remember carrying stones from a nearby wall and filling all the canoes on the lake in Eirias Park – and chuckling at the thought of the poor attendant trying to sort it all out – cruel buggers that we were!!!

As for the food being bad – nothing wrong with a nice dollop of corgi pie after a couple of hours on the key…  Any of you ever sail with Hungry Hogarths?  My mum used to send me weekly food parcels and that probably helped keep me alive.

Happy days.
_________________
73's de johnvvc
gw3vvc - keeping morse alive
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
johnvvc



Joined: 27 Feb 2012
Posts: 5


Location: Anglesey

PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 10:53 am    Post subject: 1957 - 1960 Colwyn Bay Reply with quote

>>>  I always managed to blend into the surroundings – bit like a chameleon really…  <<<

See what I mean - I didn't even give my name in my earlier posting so not much chance of anyone remembering me !!!  

SO, to put that right I'm John Parry from Anglesey.  I may have had a crew cut when I was at the College so that might trigger some memories (mind you so did lots of others...)

Since posting a couple of other inmates come to mind - Ray Williams, also from Anglesey.  He left before qualifying and eventually became an airline pilot.  Also a guy from the Isle of Man whose name eludes me.  I seem to remember he also 'went over the wall' before completing the course.
_________________
73's de johnvvc
gw3vvc - keeping morse alive
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jack Edwards



Joined: 05 Jul 2007
Posts: 878


Location: Cheshire U.K.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 06, 2014 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi John,great to see a new name on the Forum(a rare occurrence) Thanks for the memories, very interesting even to an old hand of the 1940's Happy New Year ITMA Jack.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Clarke



Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 61


Location: Isle of Anglesey

PostPosted: Tue Jan 14, 2014 2:16 pm    Post subject: Re: 1957 - 1960 Colwyn Bay Reply with quote

johnvvc wrote:
>>>  I always managed to blend into the surroundings – bit like a chameleon really…  <<<...........................SO, to put that right I'm John Parry from Anglesey.  I may have had a crew cut when I was at the College so that might trigger some memories (mind you so did lots of others...)


Hello John

I never thought of you as being a chameleon. Other things yes but not that breed. I am glad that I telephoned you in late October when I received my Amateur Radio Licence and Call-sign MW0JHC.

It was during our telecon that I mentioned the WC and the Annual Reunions.

"I’ve not attended any of the Reunions – for which I feel ashamed – especially when I read of some of the guys who travel thousands of miles to be there – I really must do something about that."

I do hope that I will see you (and your Missus) there.  After all, I know what efforts and diligence is required to organise such an event - as I have done the same every second year since 2010 for Fleetwood Nautical College. The major difference between that and the laudable WC event is that we have the College to visit as well as the social side.  I have often remarked how difficult it can be to get those living nearby to attend whereas it often takes little effort to get a Yes from those living the other side of the world. If any of you know anyone who attended Fleetwood, perhaps for their Radar or GMDSS or even the conversion to Navs when R/Os disappeared, please pass on the news of the next FNC Reunion 13/09/14 and the website: www.fleetwoodnauticalcollege.org.uk.

So, John here's hoping our next QSO will be at The County Hotel the weekend of 28th-30th March unless of course we meet up on-the-air before then.

Blwyddfyn Newydd Dda!

James
_________________
There are no strangers here. Only friends you haven't yet met.              William Butler Yeats
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
paperless



Joined: 06 Apr 2014
Posts: 1


Location: Loughborough

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi All

I have just stumbled on this forum as a result of Dahdedah's recent email and what a trip down memory lane it has been. I was a Student at WC from '59 to 61 when I left and went to Bristol to do my Radar. I did return later as an instructor (66 and 67). And what a place it was. Having had the experience of Bristol I realised just how good the methods of teaching at WC were with the material they had.

I remember Mike Zappert, Robin Filer, Simon Roach (still in touch with Simon in Cornwall). There was Taffy Jones and Pete Marshall remembered mainly because they were in the same 'Dorm' as me right at the top. And what a haven the Dingle Cafe was - what would we have done without that place.

And yes there was a Scottish fellow who went to work at the Zoo behind Colwyn Bay - he married a girl from Colwyn Bay. I am not sure if he actually did go to sea. I am blowed if I can remember his name right now but I did meet him again when I was there in '66.

Food and warmth were two important features (not). regular food parcels from home sorted the first and I remember trying newspaper for the second but seem to remember that turning over in bed was a very noisy affair.

And John, yes you did have a crew cut and I remember the week spent on the farm in Anglesy during the summer break. I think that you visited the WC later in '66 when I was there as an instructor.

The training stood me in good stead after I left the sea when I became an electronics Technical Author, a second career which I thoroughly enjoyed.

I did manage one re-union. I seem to remember that it was blowing gales and freezing cold in the hills behind Llandudno. The emails announcing the Re-unions seem to be a bit hit and miss here otherwise I would have another go at the trip to Llandudno.
It is unfortunate that the new road has ripped the heart out of CB.

Best wishes to you all
Martyn Davison
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
James Clarke



Joined: 09 Jul 2013
Posts: 61


Location: Isle of Anglesey

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2014 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

paperless wrote:
Hi All

I have just stumbled on this forum as a result of Dahdedah's recent email and what a trip down memory lane it has been. I was a Student at WC from '59 to 61 when I left and went to Bristol to do my Radar. I did return later as an instructor (66 and 67). And what a place it was. Having had the experience of Bristol I realised just how good the methods of teaching at WC were with the material they had.....................................................
I did manage one re-union. I seem to remember that it was blowing gales and freezing cold in the hills behind Llandudno. The emails announcing the Re-unions seem to be a bit hit and miss here otherwise I would have another go at the trip to Llandudno.
It is unfortunate that the new road has ripped the heart out of CB.

Best wishes to you all
Martyn Davison


Hello Martyn

I felt compelled to respond to your's because I and my wife Sue (met in Colwyn Bay in 1967) have just returned from the 2014 WC-CB Reunion which was our first and what a success it was Martyn. You really did miss a lovely weekend and the wind did not blow and the sun did actually shine.

Sue and I are already planning to attend the 2015 Reunion and I can only say to anyone who is wondering....it is a great value and fun event and we must enjoy it while we can.... and while it continues. John & the Team deserve much thanks for their sterling work and our best way to show our appreciation is to join-in and attend.

John Parry is well retired (like me - but early in my case) from his last role at Bangor University and he still lives in

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgerychwyrndrobwll-llantisiliogogogoch.

Let me know if you want his contact info - as I am sure you two would have an awful lot of catching-up to do.

James Henry Clarke
(inmate of Sept-Dec '67)
_________________
There are no strangers here. Only friends you haven't yet met.              William Butler Yeats
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Trevor Clements



Joined: 08 Nov 2007
Posts: 10


Location: Poole

PostPosted: Sat Mar 14, 2015 9:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

richardterry wrote:
Hi Trevor and James,  I doubt very much that you will remember me and in any case I am amazed how you and others recall names whereas I have the utmost difficulty.  Not surprising I suppose.  After all,  it was such a long time ago when I was a student (1956/57).  I did have a small circle of mates in my time there, notably Peter Wright (PAV) and another, Bernard Smith who loved to be referred to by his nickname.  I noted that on your list you had 'Bernardubious Smitsteffano' and it wouldn't surprise me if that was my mate. I know what happened to Peter but I have often wondered about Bernard who hailed from Crewe.  Two other close mates were two lads, one from Barton on Sea and another from Bristol.  The former described his home as 'Barton on the mud flats'  I thought I'd just pitch in one or two things that have stuck with me, none of which are in any particular order.  Living was not easy, the winters were freezing, the food was rubbish (we were always starving) but the mid morning walk down to the Dingle Café was great if we could afford a mug of tea and a Wagon Wheel biscuit.  The parrot there loved snapping pencils in half.  Sid Carruthers was the local hard man who wanted to sort out our Sid Kaprinski who frightened me to death incidentally. The Saturday night dance on the Pier was a highlight and a group of us would obtain Dutch courage by pooling our limited cash to buy a bottle of English VP wine which we used to top up pints of rough cider obtained from a bar on the pier. I was lucky because my older sisters had taught me to dance years earlier and there were loads of girls able and willing to take to the floor with me.  One in particular was called Pat from Old Colwyn, a beautiful but somewhat old fashioned girl who taught at the local Sunday School.  Say no more!  We spent  a number evenings at the local cinema just along from the station and the two films I recall well were 'Tarantula' and 'High Society'but there were many others and it was a great form of escapism.  The National Milk Bar next to the station was another haunt.  There was an evening when a load of College boys took to the water in Erias Park releasing all the pleasure boats and then suddenly  realised that the local police had arrived unannounced. We all hot footed it back to our dorms and popped into bed in wet clothes. The plod systematically worked their way around the building trying to identify the offenders.  They gave up in the end, there were far too many. I have more memories of course and won't bore you anymore at the moment except to say that I was in a dorm with a Welsh guy who used to burgle the seafront kiosks and return the stolen booty for distribution.  I hasten to add that this frightened me to death and I didn't get involved or receive anything. I think it was a case of live and let live. St Patrick's Night was always great. I got drunk and fell down two or three flights of stairs.  Not a scratch on me. It's surprising what you can get away with when you are under the influence of wompo. Anyway I hope some of this rings a bell with you guys.
Richard


Some great memories here. The National Milk Bar, I spent many a (un)happy hour in there. Bernard Smith was indeed Bernadubious Smitstefano, I really liked him, but he left before I did, because |I kept failing the theory. Then I got myself a local girlfriend from the Grammar School, and shame made me pass theory practical and 1st class theory in successive terms. We were perpetually hungry thanks to the cooking of Mrs Mac and her infamous 'corgi pie'. I went back just over a year after leaving to visit my old girl friend, and although we are friends to this day she had 'moved on'.


_________________
Trevor Clements
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    wirelesscollege.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> Jack & Alans Hostilery All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Card File  Gallery  Forum Archive
Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum